Showing posts with label society and culture. Show all posts
Showing posts with label society and culture. Show all posts

15 November 2016

Dream Italian? Think Italian. Be Italian! (2nd Time Around)

Still continuing to dream my impossible dream. This blog post - Dream Italian? Think Italian. Be Italian! - (1st published in 2015) enjoys popularity, no matter where it is shared. That lets me know there are lots of people who probably dream of vacationing or even living in Italy.

Assuming that's true, I decided to go a 2nd time around and supplement the content for my original post with some additional information found at the HUBPages writing community.  Currently, my writer's profile shows 20 HUBs (or articles). However the only one that comes close to the topic of Italy is the one titled The Seven Kings of Rome


Here are some suggested reads published by my fellow HUBBERs that you are sure to enjoy.
Travel to Italy with them!


How to Be Italian


How to Be Italian

Venice; A Brief History of a Unique City, and the First Impressions of a Visiting Tourist


Venice; A Brief History of a Unique City, and the First Impressions of a Visiting Tourist

Lecce - Italy's Best Kept Secret


Lecce - Italy's Best Kept Secret

Verona, Italy: A City for Lovers of Architecture


Verona, Italy: A City for Lovers of Architecture

Naples, Italy: Great Food at a Cheap Price!


Naples, Italy: Great Food at a Cheap Price!




25 October 2016

Good Fortune: Okyo's Cranes Now on View | Unframed (Reblog)

Good fortune and longevity? Every culture should and probably does have something that symbolizes this. In Japan it's the crane. Would be interesting to research the symbols of other countries. Or ... ??? Maybe we could ask Robert Langdon. :) Jokes aside, click the link because this artwork is exquisite!

 

" ... Maruyama Okyo (1733–95), a painter who revolutionized the practice and taught or influenced generations of Japanese painters."



Good Fortune: Okyo's Cranes Now on View | Unframed




(NOTE: At the time of the posting the paintings were on exhibit; not at the time of this reblogging.)





The Okyo artwork motivated me to search for more pictures, photos, and illustrations of cranes. Found this beautiful photograph of Grey Crowned Cranes and wanted to share it.





27 April 2016

Should Churches be Tax-Exempt? | HUBpages Contributor Catherine Giordano

It seems the U.S. laws regarding tax exemptions for churches, other religious institutions and non-profit organizations is a carry over from the days of Emperor Constantine. 

But is it really a good idea?


This matter was and is being discussed thoroughly.  
Click link below.

Should Churches beTax-Exempt?




These are only partial comments submitted by me and approved by the author.  Completed comments are a bit "windy".  :)
Fair? Unfair? Tax? No tax? Interesting discussion but for the faithful, it's just “much ado about nothing”. Speaking with respect to Christians. Can't speak for the mission of other religious organizations and non-profits, but the mission of the body of Christ is clearly spelled out in Matthew 28: 19 – 20 (and other scriptures). If you don't tax the church, we'll carry out the mission. If you tax the church, we'll carry out the mission. Jesus left the example. He didn't argue about paying taxes. He paid the tax and carried on with His work. (Matthew 22: 21) So the question has already been answered. Whatever the government in any country decides to do ... i.e. taxing, imprisonment, etc, ... the “laborers” will continue God's work until “The Harvest”. Christians don't need government support or approval to know and to do what is right.

You will find many HUBpages article links shared via this blog.  HUBPages is a spirited community where one can usually find intelligent conversation and interesting reading material on all kinds of subjects; not just religion and politics and history, which are usually my interests.  It gives me great pleasure to direct readers to pages penned by my fellow freelance writers.  Why should I have all the fun?  :)

Would you like to join the discussion?


Sign in or Sign up and post using a HubPages Network account. 


http://amzn.to/26uPLpM

“… the fruit of 16 years of research in Talmudic, gnostic, cabalistic, apocalyptic, patristic, and legendary texts. …”


02 April 2016

Searching for Chinese Treasures

Planning a trip to China? Hoping to find hidden treasure from the ancient world? Students who compare civilizations in world history are aware that like the pharaohs of Egypt , the Chinese emperors and leaders buried treasures with them for their after life. 

 

It was reported in 2009 that Chinese archaeologists uncovered an 1800-year-old tomb in Xigaoxue , which they believed to be the genuine tomb of a Chinese general Cao Cao . Hundreds of relics were recovered, but some experts were not convinced the bones belonged to the military leader and wanted DNA tests done. Evidently, they had the bones of the general's son which had been discovered in 1951. 

 

The treasures of the Tombs of Southern Song Dynasty emperors were found but they had already been robbed. Perhaps there might still be some hidden tombs that the grave robbers could not locate or access. 
 

Curious seekers wanting to find treasures of ancient China often search for undiscovered tombs, but based on some interesting information uncovered doing research to write another article, it appears that searching for ships lost at sea or shipwrecks, might be just as profitable.

Content first published at PersonaPaper, July 8, 2015.

Like to dabble in Asian studies? 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
http://cmoneyspinner.tumblr.com/post/134164621994/who-are-the-four-beauties-of-ancient-china-this



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
http://ahencyclopedia.tumblr.com/post/139354113884/book-review-your-travel-guide-to-ancient-china-by




13 January 2016

What Does Shivat Haminim Mean?

Seven Species of the Land of Israel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Found this precious gem shared by a fellow freelance writer at HUBPages.com, an online writing community where many of the writers are experts or have such a passion that they speak with such thorough knowledge on a subject that you would dub them an "authority" on the matter.

"For the LORD thy God bringeth thee into a good land, a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths, springing forth in valleys and hills; a land of wheat and barley, and vines and fig-trees and pomegranates; a land of olive-trees and honey;" (Deuteronomy 8:7-8)

The fruits and grains mentioned in this scripture are called the seven species (shivat haminim). In Israel, they have special status.

Seven Species. Fruits and Vegetables of Holy Land

As many times as I have read this scripture, it's now seen in a new light. That's one of the joys of reading the Bible. Sacred mysteries are constantly revealed.


Seven Species of the Land of Israel
Seven Species of the Land of Israel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)



12 January 2016

All Those "ites"

Now that you know how to read you can read the Bible for yourself. That's what my momma said.



Most Bible readers (from my generation and the generations in the centuries before mine) will likely say what struck them when the first read the scriptures was all those "begats". Some people will skip over verses, even whole chapters if they see that word. The word "begat" usually connects a string of names that are very difficult to pronounce.

For me, one of things noted when turning the pages of the Old Testament starting with Genesis and working my way to the Revelation was all those "ites". The names for the inhabitants of different ancient nations.

Hittites, Asherites, Jebusites, Amorites, Amakelites, Girgashites, Moabites, Perizzites, Canaanites, and of course, Israelites.

Then it changed from "ites" to "ans".

Syrians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Romans.

Suffixes in the English language:

ite = follower or supporter

an = pertaining to
* ian = belonging to

Belonging to? Hmmm?  Like Christians?

Yes. Only Christ is not a nation. Christianity and the gospel message of peace and goodwill is not restricted by man-made boundaries. But it's an observation as to how the suffixes were used by the scholarly translators.

JAT. (Just a thought.) :)



glitter-graphics.com


Fellow freelance writer "Javaman" shared this post:

World History - Histomap

If my view were a "theory", the histomap would have thoroughly disproved it.  Alas.  It's not a theory.  It's just a thought.  :)

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01 November 2015

Native American Contemporary Artist: Tony Abeyta

Tony Abeyta
Native American Painter; Born 1965


Original paintings are in public art galleries worldwide and American museums, such as the National Museum of the American Indian, Washington D.C./New York City.


Tony Abeyta is of Navajo and Anglo-American descent, the son of the late Navajo painter Ha-So-De (Narciso Abeyta). He was raised in Gallup, New Mexico, a small town surrounded by the Zuni (Pueblo Native Americans) and Navajo reservation. Pursuing his educational aspirations provided him an opportunity to travel. He has studied at art institutions in Baltimore, Chicago, Maine, New York, France and Italy. Though much of his work is rooted in a complex Navajo culture, it also displays elements of a progressive cultural experience.


"I try to diversify as an artist and there are certainly many directions I take as a painter." - Tony Abeytar


Tony Abeyta is accepted as one of the finest young contemporary painters today, as well as one of the most innovative Native American artists of his generation. I. For further biographical information, click on the link to above to his official website or the links supplied below:


If interested learning more about other Native American Contemporary Artists, visit the Native Art Network.




Native American Contemporary Artist: Dan Namingha

Dan Namingha
Native American Painter/Sculptor; Born 1950 -



To work around the traditional art system, i.e. non-recognition of Native American artists, Namingha opened his own gallery. Niman Fine Art is a family-owned and operated gallery representing the works of internationally known artist Dan Namingha and other Namingha family members. His original works are also available at art galleries worldwide; for example, Artnet Galleries.


From the Tewa-Hopi tribe, Dan Namingha was born on the Hopi reservation in Keams Canyon, Arizona. In 2009, Dan Namingha received an Honorary Doctorate from the Institute of American Indian Arts. Like most artists, from very young (2nd grade) his artistic abilities provided him an avenue of creative expression. His work shows the influence of his Hopi background but his sculptures also incorporate cubism. Links to additional bio notes:

"I see myself as a kind of bridge between worlds, trying to find that center line of balance." - Dan Namingha




Native American Contemporary Artist: Kevin Red Star

November is Native American Heritage Month in the United States of America.

3-part blog post. Spotlight on three Native American artists of Crow, Hopi and Navajo descent, who share the art resulting from their culture and traditions with the world.

"What started at the turn of the century as an effort to gain a day of recognition for the significant contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the U.S., has resulted in a whole month being designated for that purpose." - Quote Source: Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Department of the Interior


In 1990, President George H. W. Bush approved a joint resolution which designated November as "National American Indian Heritage Month". Below are profiles of three Native American artists whose persistent and diligent efforts have introduced the contemporary art of descendants of the first Americans to an international audience.


Kevin Red Star
Native American Painter; Born 1943 -



Kevin Red Star is a celebrated artist who is internationally known. He was born on the Crow Indian Reservation in Lodge Grass, Montana. He is the recipient of 2 Honorary Doctorate degrees. He was awarded an Honorary Doctorate Degree in Fine Art from the Rocky Mountain College in Billings, Montana in 1997; and an Honorary Doctorate Degree from the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 2010. Click link below to read additional bio notes:


"Indian culture has in the past been ignored to a great extent." -- Kevin Red Star


Well thanks to his efforts and that of many others who support the preservation of our Native American history, culture and heritage, it will be ignored no longer. Red Star's work can be found in numerous important museum collections, including but not limited to The Smithsonian Institution - National Museum of the American Indian.




18 July 2015

Dream Italian? Think Italian. Be Italian!


* SPOTLIGHT ON: Italy

 
Did you know:
  • Italy is shaped like a boot!
  • Italy has the lowest birthrate in all of Europe. How strange since Italian families are so large! Italians live a very long time! They consume 66 pounds of pasta and 60 litres of wine a year!
  • Naples introduced the world to pizza!
  • In Ivrea they celebrate Lent by throwing oranges at each other.
  • Everyday 3,000 Euro get thrown into the Trevi Fountain.
  • Florence Nightingale was named for the city of her birth.
  • Rome is known as the “Eternal City” and the “Caput Mundi”.
Read more at:
Fun Facts on Italy

Also, did you know that Italy is a country of choice for some expatriates. I did not know that. I thought all expatriates moved to The Bahamas. Of course, in my narrow-minded way of thinking, I was only thinking that it was Americans who were choosing to expatriate. There are people who live in other countries who choose to leave their homelands too. Shocking, I know! You’d think it’s was only the Americans who would become disgruntled. We’re such big babies. We complain about everything and never count our blessings. Some of US. Not all. I’m not considering expatriation and don’t think I ever will. I don’t care what Rick Steves says, he is not gonna make a convert out of me!!! :) But since Italy invented pizza*, I think it reasonable to place this country on a list of “Possible Countries to Live In as an Expat and/or At Least Go On Vacation There”.


(* Per one source.  Another source says it was the Persians.  Me?  Just happy it was invented!  See my Google+ Collection:  PIZZA Craving.)
 
Read more at:

Fun & Interesting Facts about the Culture in Italy



Wherever you go - BE SAFE and HAPPY VACATIONING!!



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More Travel-Related Posts at My Blog Stop!





27 May 2015

One Famous Indonesian Food Item Is Not Historically Indonesian

A general review of the History of the Exotic Spice Trade will eventually lead to Indonesia.





"One Famous Indonesian Food Item Is Not Historically Indonesian
During the years 1602 to 1942, what is now the Republic of Indonesia was a Dutch colony. ... The tradition of Indonesian food known today as Rijstafel, which means Rice Table, was started by the Dutch. ..."

Read more at: Indonesian Food History – Rijistafel | Daily Two Cents


"Rijsttafel" by Jan Willem van Wessel from Rotterdam, Netherlands - Rijsttafel 13. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.



EES shares recipes, cooking tips
and all things foodie!

 


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Can you write short posts - approximately 100 words - about a topic? 
Earn Money For Publishing Short Posts at Daily Two Cents (dailytwocents.com).

14 January 2015

The Welcoming Culture of the Bedouin Peoples

Bedouin tribes have a central welcoming culture that is very open to visitors. They use this welcoming of guests to show their respect to God and welcome people into their homes through the uses of tea and coffee.
 
The Welcoming Culture of the Bedouin Peoples  By Brian J Thomas
» Read on »

Coffee Time
 Traditional Bedouin melodies. 

Brewing Coffee Outside a Bedouin Tent, Sinai, Egypt, North Africa, Africa
Brewing Coffee Outside a Bedouin Tent, Sinai, Egypt, North Africa, Africa ~ Nico Tondini ~ Allposters.com

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